War at our doorstep, or what we are calling for

Original article was written by Lidžita, Lithuanian blogger and hereby translated to English by Albina Griniūtė.

War at our doorstep, or what we are calling for

At the beginning of the war in Ukraine, a friend of mine and me were talking about how most Europeans have no idea what it is and how real it is. And not just in Ukraine. In Lithuania. In Germany. Throughout the whole of Europe.

The succession of events made it clear that even now, more than a year after that dreadful time, the attitude of most people is still the same.

The last event that made it clear most Europeans do not realize they are standing on a doorstep of WWIII was the popular Eurovision song contest where the Russian entry won an honorable second place.

Russia found a way how to use it to justify its aggression and encourage its citizens to believe that to slaughter a brotherly nation is normal and even praiseworthy.

“Congratulations to Polina Gagarina for her undisputed success and to Russia for the successful Europe-wide referendum where it was demonstrated which place, according to ordinary citizens of European countries, Russia should hold. In my opinion, both the politicians and the European media should listen to the “Million Voices” (title of P. Gagarina’s song) of their citizens. They are calling for normal relations with Russia”, wrote Konstantin Kosachev on his Facebook page.

So, what was “just a song” for an ordinary German, an ordinary Russian understood as a message saying “we are supported by the whole of Europe”. Is it still necessary to explain what message was transmitted by „Million voices“ and what message Russia received back?

I don’t give a damn if she sings well because only a madman can represent a country that occupies another, and shriek “Praying for peace and healing” while wearing a white dress.

I don’t give a damn if she sings well because only a madman can represent a country that occupies another, and shriek “Praying for peace and healing” while wearing a white dress.

Without a doubt, Gagarina was a symbol. A symbol of Russian PR and limitless naïveté. A symbol of aggression represented as peace. Of violence covered in faux tenderness. Of Russia – in the true sense of the word.

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That old, familiar pattern: Russian invasion of Ukraine

There was common pattern for all the communist revolutions around the world.

There was common pattern for all the communist revolutions around the world.

Written by Rokiškis Rabinovičius, kindly translated from Lithuanian by Martynas Klimas

It all started from people rising up against Viktor Yanukovitch rather than any actions undertaken by Russia. Maybe this inverse was what made people miss the old Russian invasion pattern appear in Ukraine. Or was it because we were used to seeing the pattern develop from the other side?

The pattern is old, having undergone first trials about a century ago. As time went by, it was refined, well drilled into everyone’s mind, until it was finally made into a set of standard invasion plans. A whole systemic methodology of invading other countries that, when the time came, only required minor adaptations.

Talks that Vladimir Putin is waging info war like no one has done before are, at best, naïve. He is not creating anything new or revolutionary; Putin is barely taking the well drilled KGB invasion plan and adapting it to current needs. Those methods are a dead ringer to the best hits of USSR invasions.

The entire thing is usually done under the cover of standard bullshit. It all goes through several structural channels: leftist commie cells from around the world, official soviet press and through various press offices in Moscow that publish left and right, trying to pass off their bullshit as something that the locals wrote themselves. In the good old days, newspapers printed in Moscow were presented as supposedly printed somewhere else. Today, the same things goes on the Internet.

We have to pay attention to the real thing: the invasion pattern. A series of events that happen concurrently with a Bolshevik invasion. Then we see, time and time again, a same pattern emerge with only the slightest of adaptations.

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May 22, Lithuanian media round-up

On 21st of May ambassador Raimonda Murmokaitė, Lithuania’s Permanent Representative to the UN, at the United Nations Security Council meeting expressed a grave concern over an increasing number of human rights violations in the east and south of Ukraine, including abductions, taking of hostages, arbitrary detentions, beatings and torture of civilians, attacks on journalists, as well as arbitrary executions carried out by pro-Russian separatists. She also stressed an increasing number of violations and harassment against Crimean Tatars, noting a growing number of displacements among Tatar population and restrictions of their political, social and economic rights. (Lithuanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs information)

On 22nd of May Alexander Lukashenko, President of Belarus, in an exclusive interview to Kseniya Sobchak in TV station ‘Dozd’ said that ‘he would fight with anyone who invades to Belarus event if it would be Putin.’ (delfi.lt, kaunodiena.lt)

On 21st of May Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russian activist of opposition in an interview to the BBC told that ‘Ukraine had entered a “slow-burn civil war” but he did not believe Russian President Vladimir Putin was planning to actually invade eastern Ukraine.’ (delfi.lt, 15min.lt). Read and watch more on BBC: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-27513321.

On 20th of May Edward Lucas, British journalist, in his article about Prince Charles private remark that Vladimir Putin was behaving like Adolf Hitler analyzed the similarities and differences between Hitler and Putin and situation before the World War II and current one in Ukraine (Lithuania Tribune, 15min.lt). Read more in Daily Mail: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2635617/Hitler-Putin-Charles-right.html.

On 22nd of May Yaroslav Melnyk, Ukrainian contemporary writer, in an ‘Open dialogue’ radio programme said that ‘Russia used the tactics of Goebbels and was able to indoctrinate to the subconsciousness of Russians that Russia is a great state and that it must rule if not the world then at least our region.’ Yaroslav also added that Russians including Russians of Ukraine are recovering from that propaganda and starting to judge actions of Putin in Ukraine less favourably.’ (The News Radio)




Dmitry Tymchuk: Russian propaganda on “peacekeeping operation”

Translated by Andriy Berbets and edited by Alex Howard for Voices of Ukraine

According to Information Resistance data, pro-Russian extremists are conducting an intense propaganda campaign amongst the population in Luhansk and Donetsk Regions. Its purpose is to force citizens to take part in the so-called ‘referendum’ to ensure the split of Ukraine. You can read more of it here: http://inforesist.org/russia-is-preparing-a-peace-keeping-operation-in-ukraine/?lang=en.

The separatists are trying to give the impression that during the ‘referendum’, Russia will be able to deploy ‘peacekeeping forces’ on the territory of Ukraine, in order to help stabilize the situation in the region, as their main argument in their attempt to convince the people.

About the fact that Russia is itself fueling the flames of civil war in Ukraine, and that the actions taken by the separatists themselves are destabilizing the situation in these regions, there is only silence.

At the same time we’d like to note that, throughout last week, the so-called Russian ‘expert community’ (e.g. the ‘Gazprom’ funded Moscow Strategic Culture Foundation, the Academy of Geopolitical Problems, the Center of Strategic Conjuncture etc.) began actively promoting the idea that a Russian ‘peacekeeping operation’ is strongly needed on the territory of Ukraine.

The main premise in this case is that a “peacekeeping operation” should be conducted by Russia without any consent from the UN (United Nations), as the involvement of the UN supposedly allows the West ‘to seize the initiative’ and to move their troops into Ukraine after receiving a UN mandate. But, as you know, Russia’s membership in the UN Security Council is absolutely unjustifiable, because this country is the aggressor, so it does not allow the UN Security Council to make any efforts in the resolution of the crisis in Ukraine, including carrying out peacekeeping operations by third parties.

Theoretically, Putin has two options to conduct a ‘peacekeeping operation’: to carry it out under the auspices of the SCO [Shanghai Cooperation Organization] or the CSTO [Collective Security Treaty Organization].

Currently the first option is not possible, because China, as a member of the SCO, would clearly not agree to this kind of global adventure.

What about Moscow’s pocket union, otherwise known as the CSTO? As it’s well known, Putin is currently applying increased pressure on the presidents of the satellite countries. It’s worthwhile remembering the recent military exercises of the Russian Armed Forces, where the question of the use of nuclear weapons was discussed under the personal leadership of Putin, with the presidents of Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan in attendance.

The President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko, who has not previously supported Russian aggression against Ukraine, has suddenly and inexplicably changed his rhetoric. This change of position miraculously coincided with the message that Russia is ready to give Belarus a $2 billion loan in order to replenish its foreign exchange reserves.

However, the CSTO has no legal grounds for ‘peacekeeping’ in Ukraine, as Ukraine is not a member of the organization. Article 3 of the Agreement on the CSTO peacekeeping operations provides that the organization can perform such activities based on their own decisions only on the territory of the CSTO member states. In the case of non-member countries of the CSTO, approval from the UN Security Council must be obtained first.

This means that any attempt by Russia to move its troops into Ukraine under any pretext, whether alone or in an “alliance” with its satellites, will mean direct military aggression against sovereign Ukraine, or rather the second stage of aggression after Crimea.

Dmitry Tymchuk’s Military Blog: Summary – May 8, 2014

Translated and edited by Voices of Ukraine

I apologize for posting our summary a little earlier today, for organizational reasons. Hopefully, nothing bad will happen by the end of today. If something good happens–please.

The bad news:

1. In Luhansk and Donetsk, the pro-Russian clowns, who loudly announced themselves as ‘National Councils’ (although ‘alcoholic interest clubs’ or ‘Putin’s money fan clubs’ would be more appropriate) have nevertheless decided to hold their show named ‘referendum on independence’ in these Regions.

Tonight, good people burned to hell over a million prepared blank forms in the printing shops of Donbass. But Moscow has money in bulk. They will print out more.

In general, after the upcoming exacerbation on May 9, [people] should prepare for events after May 11, when this very ‘referendum’ is scheduled. This scenario is known from [events in] Crimea: just under 100% of the population will ‘vote’ for ‘independence’ and Uncle Vova [diminutive for Vladimir Putin] will tend to the ‘protection of people’s will’ thereafter.

If we don’t stop this separatist circus now, it will be much more difficult to do it later.

2. An armored ‘Tiger’ vehicle broke through the border checkpoint from Russia–a ‘gift’ to separatism from [controversial Russian politician, Vladimir] Zhirinovsky. Then, it traveled through Luhansk.

What an outrageous occurrence. But here, I’d like to share our common alarming observations in general.

Yes, the overall reliability of the Ukrainian-Russian border protection in Luhansk and Donetsk Regions is questionable. On the one hand, nobody has cancelled corruption. But a far greater problem is that the border control officers do not have significant forces and capabilities to cope with large extremist groups or, as in this case, with armored vehicles, on their own.

This is–the task for other law enforcement agencies, which should reinforce the ‘border guards.’ If there is no cooperation, then we won’t be able to resolve the border issue.

3. Today, Putin has gathered the Presidents of his satellite countries from the Collective Security Treaty Organization–Kazakhstan, Belarus, Armenia, and Kyrgyzstan. He decided to show them the ‘Potemkin’ exercises of the Russian troops. They rolled out serious weaponry–a heavy flame thrower system TOS-1. Gave the command to open fire.

And… pshik… zilch. Nothing happened.

If I were a Russian, I would be concerned by the fact that their miracle leader who only has tanchiki [diminutive for tanks] in mind also has a nuclear button. If this maniac, preparing to fight with the whole world, decides to use it, there will be no Urals anymore. Moscow Region will cease to exist, too. For the arms of valiant Russian warriors do not grow out of the same place that all normal people’s arms grow.

The bad thing about this is that Putin doesn’t intend to impress the world with high-tech, efficient farming or Russian culture. This insane individual can do nothing else but rattle a saber. Even if it doesn’t always perform.

The good news:

1. The Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council Andrey Parubiy has announced that yesterday’s statement by Putin to postpone the ‘referendum’ by Ukrainian separatists–is a political scam.

The Ukrainian government is well aware that Putin’s words are lies backed by nothing else except nefarious plans to lull Kiev’s alertness. And this means that the anti-terrorist operation [ATO] will continue for as long as Ukrainian terrorists don’t rest. In detention center or on the long-suffering land of Donbass.

It’s obvious there is nothing good about Putin’s lie. But the fact that the Ukrainian government doesn’t believe in it, and is ready to continue to save Ukraine–is a definite plus.

2. By lunchtime today, we ended the monitoring of regional preparation for possible provocations that may take place tomorrow, May 9. If the overall forecast is not very reassuring, then it at least gives us hope.

Yes, there are a lot of weaknesses. But in general, the security forces and local authorities have taken measures to ensure that a tragedy like the events in Odessa on May 2 won’t be repeated.

Of course, we can’t make any promises. And we don’t expect that Victory Day will go smoothly. We must be ready for anything–especially those of us in Donbass.

3. On the eve of Victory Day, Russian social media broadcast information that in the Alexander Garden in the Kremlin, the only stele dedicated to the Hero cities in the heart of Moscow that remained without flowers–was the stele of Kiev.

Just a couple of hours after this message, the stele of the Hero city of Kiev was inundated with flowers.

There are adequate people still left in Moscow. Thank you to them. After all, Victory Day is our common holiday. And we, the IR group, would like to congratulate all of you, my brothers and sisters, with it!

And [a couple of words] for the future. We defeated Hitler’s Nazism, and we will defeat Putin’s Nazism.