May 22, Lithuanian media round-up

On 21st of May ambassador Raimonda Murmokaitė, Lithuania’s Permanent Representative to the UN, at the United Nations Security Council meeting expressed a grave concern over an increasing number of human rights violations in the east and south of Ukraine, including abductions, taking of hostages, arbitrary detentions, beatings and torture of civilians, attacks on journalists, as well as arbitrary executions carried out by pro-Russian separatists. She also stressed an increasing number of violations and harassment against Crimean Tatars, noting a growing number of displacements among Tatar population and restrictions of their political, social and economic rights. (Lithuanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs information)

On 22nd of May Alexander Lukashenko, President of Belarus, in an exclusive interview to Kseniya Sobchak in TV station ‘Dozd’ said that ‘he would fight with anyone who invades to Belarus event if it would be Putin.’ (,

On 21st of May Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russian activist of opposition in an interview to the BBC told that ‘Ukraine had entered a “slow-burn civil war” but he did not believe Russian President Vladimir Putin was planning to actually invade eastern Ukraine.’ (, Read and watch more on BBC:

On 20th of May Edward Lucas, British journalist, in his article about Prince Charles private remark that Vladimir Putin was behaving like Adolf Hitler analyzed the similarities and differences between Hitler and Putin and situation before the World War II and current one in Ukraine (Lithuania Tribune, Read more in Daily Mail:

On 22nd of May Yaroslav Melnyk, Ukrainian contemporary writer, in an ‘Open dialogue’ radio programme said that ‘Russia used the tactics of Goebbels and was able to indoctrinate to the subconsciousness of Russians that Russia is a great state and that it must rule if not the world then at least our region.’ Yaroslav also added that Russians including Russians of Ukraine are recovering from that propaganda and starting to judge actions of Putin in Ukraine less favourably.’ (The News Radio)




Thousands of Crimean Tatars Mark 70th Anniversary of Deportation

Source: Euromaidanpr

Despite a ban on any demonstrations by the Russian occupation authorities and a decision by the Milli Mejlis not to hold a mass commemoration lest it become the occasion for a Russian provocation, thousands of Crimean Tatars have assembled in their homeland today to mark the 70th anniversary of their deportation by Stalin.

Today (ed.-18th of May), all roads approaching Simferopol were under surveillance by the police and security forces, to make sure that Crimean Tatars weren’t able to get to their traditional May 18th rally in an organized manner. Most people decided to get to the rally separately. Russian security forces created artificial traffic jams on the main roads. So, many people ended up walking to the rally point at the Ak-Mosque/Kebir-Jami Mosque in pouring rain, leaving their cars behind. Moreover, there entire city was chock full of the ‘self-defense’ gangs with helicopters flying over. About 40 minutes after the the rally started, helicopters left and it stopped raining.

Despite all efforts to prevent the commemoration, several hundred people with Crimean Tatar national flags finally assembled in the Salgirka Park, and several hundred more met in the square in front of that city’s railroad station where the foundation has been laid for a future monument to the deportation which involved 200,000 Crimean Tatars, a large fraction of whom died as a result.

They were peaceful, did not use loudspeakers as in the past, and were surrounded by a heavy presence of Russian security officers. After brief meetings, they left in small groups via public transport and traveled to the predominantly Crimean Tatar Akmechet district away from the city center where they have joined more than 5,000 others

According to the Kryminform news agency, people from all parts of Simferopol as well as neighboring regions are at the meeting. They are carrying Crimean Tatar flags and slogans like “The Motherland! The People! Crimea!” And they are being addressed by longtime veterans of the Crimean Tatar national movement.

Also in attendance are representatives of the other peoples who were deported from the peninsula in 1944. In the air above the demonstration, Kryminform reports, there are two government helicopters. But as of this writing (0630 EDT in the United States), security officials have tried to enforce their regime’s ban on such meetings or reports of any clashes between them and the Crimean Tatars.

You can also read this photo report about commemoration in Simferopol: And Dmitry Tymchuk also writes about it here:

Meeting ‘Light a fire in your heart’ was held in Lviv (photos by Alim Aliev)



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Dnipropetrovsk also held a rally commemorating the deportation of Crimean Tatars on May 17. The Crimean national symbol ‘tamga’ was formed out of lit candles on the bank of the Dnieper river. Representatives of the Crimean Tatar community as well as Ukrainians and people of other nationalities participated in the gathering. The activists plan to ask the city authorities to grant them a flowerbed where volunteers will make a ‘tamga’ out of planted flowers.

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Commemoration in Dzhankoy: 

Beyond the borders of Crimea, there have been meetings and declarations of support for the Crimean Tatars and their cause from governments and public organizations around the world. The quiet courage the Crimean Tatars have displayed in coming out today in the face of a new wave of Russian repression will only gain them and their cause more support.

And consequently, while the number of Crimean Tatars taking part in this year’s round anniversary commemoration is smaller than the 30,000 who have typically gathered in recent years, the event this year has achieved even more for the Crimean Tatar cause and its fight for justice than did any previous meeting.

May 17, Lithuania media round-up

On 17th of May, news portal published an interview with Elvina Ergashova, Crimean Tatar. She said that ‘Tatar’s situation in Crimea is very tense at this moment.’ Also Elvina hopes that Crimea will come back to Ukraine in a year or two and this chaos and terror will come to an end.’ (

On 17th of May, Vytautas Leškevičius, Lithuanian Vice-minister of Foreign Affairs, met with Mustafa Dzhemilev, Leader of the Crimean Tatars, in Kiev. According to Mustafa Dzhemilev, ‘kidnapping of Tatars, prohibition to speak the native language, limitations of the meeting law, discrimination and even murders because of ethnicity became common place in occupied Crimea.’ (ELTA,

John Kerry, US Secretary of the Department of State, has made a statement on the 70th anniversary of Joseph Stalin’s forcible deportation of more than 230,000 Crimean Tatars from their homeland in Crimea. In his statement, he said that ‘for many Crimean Tatars, these abuses are still fresh in their minds and current Russia’s occupation and illegal attempt to annex Crimea has reopened these old wounds.’ (

Dmitry Tymchuk Military blog: summary for May 16

By Dmitry Tymchuk, Translated and edited by Voices of Ukraine

The bad news:

1. Today, we recorded a gathering of Russian troops previously located in the 100 km [62 mile] zone from the border between the Russian Federation and Ukraine, closer to the Ukrainian border. At the same time, they did not approach the direct line-of-sight zone immediately next to the border.

Russian commanders were instructed to prepare for a “peacekeeping operation.” Our border patrol servicemen note that the provocations at the border have died down.

It’s like the calm before the storm.

Although, if Vladimir Putin really wanted to move his troops into Ukraine–Moscow would have recognized the results of the May 11 “pseudoreferendums” in Donbass and would have done so.

It seems that this is just the continuation of long-standing pressure. Let’s see what happens close to the Presidential elections in Ukraine (scheduled for May 25). But we must be ready or anything–however, the Ukrainian Ministry of Defense reported that the army is ready for the invasion scenario.

2. The anti-terrorist operation (ATO) once again resumed its crazy jolts. After yesterday’s pro-active phase, the special forces calmed down too quickly–and instantly received a reply.

In Donetsk and Slavyansk, terrorists keep building impressive checkpoints in broad daylight. They bring in the construction cranes, and install the concrete blocks. Military bases and even staff headquarters are being attacked–as happened with the HQ of the Eastern Operative Association of the National Guard in Donetsk.

To be honest with you, it’s already getting tired. Personally, I have no words for it. It’s already not a betrayal or “leaks” of the ATO–it’s some bloody surrealistic art house. And endless at that.

3. The Crimean Tatars. The day after tomorrow is the anniversary of their deportation (from Crimea to primarily Uzbek USSR). This year, they will celebrate this tragic date in a big prison camp once again–no longer called the “USSR” but the “Russian Federation.”

Crimean Tatars have been prohibited from holding any public events. Their homes are being searched throughout. Crimea is stuffed to its eyeballs with OMON police. In a word: Putin-style democracy.

We shouldn’t forget about our Crimean brothers–neither Crimean Tatars nor Ukrainians. Currently Kiev seems to have stopped paying attention to their problems. We don’t hear their confident and harsh statements addressed to Moscow regarding gross human rights violations in Crimea. We consider this a betrayal.

We, the Information Resistance group, are restoring our (information) network and resuming our work in Crimea. It’s our duty. Forgive us for temporarily being distracted from fulfilling our duty.

The good news:

1. The Prosecutor General’s office of Ukraine has finally officially recognized the “People’s Republic of Luhansk” (LPR) and “People’s Republic of Donetsk” (DPR) the terrorist organizations. This was the First Deputy to the Prosecutor General, Nikolay Golomsha.

The fact that these gentlemen who kidnap people and kill-rob-and-rape them, can never be called members of the Macrame Lovers Club, is obvious to everyone. But we now have their official definition. Everyone in the world knows what a terrorist is.

Today, I also resorted to polemics with a representative from Akhmetov’s company on this. She tried to prove to the whole wide world that cooperation with terrorists, as Rinat Akhmetov’s “Metinvest” engages in (accompanied by demands requiring Ukrainian security forces get out of Donbass), is a pledge of peace and prosperity. And since I criticize this tender friendship between Akhmetov’s structures and terrorists, I must be a very bad man. Like, the bandits in Donbass are not terrorists at all, but almost cute and pleasant people.

From now on, these guys can no longer justify their actions. Anyone who recognizes the “DPR” and “LPR” and enters into cooperation with them–are officially the accomplices of terrorists. In addition to our local “princelings” represented by oligarchs in the East, it also applies to the main sponsor of terrorism in Ukraine–Russia.

2. The UN report on Ukraine dotted it’s “i’s”.

The United Nations stated who the pro-Russian “people’s militia” (as Russia calls them) truly are. And this image completely coincides with that seen by simple Ukrainian citizens, patriots of their country. And thugs and criminals is what we see.

What’s even funnier is that Russia got immediately outraged by this. The Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in its deceitful terminology of propaganda, criticized the UN. According to Russian authorities, their own lying propagandists who get rewarded with prizes and awards by Vladimir Putin for dragging Ukraine into the mud, are the truth of last resort. And the rest of the world lies.

Really, the Kremlin inhabitants have the same rotten barley cereals instead of brains that little Russian soldiers devour in Rostov Region at the border with Ukraine.

3. In Luhansk, the terrorist Alexei Rilke, the man dubbed as the “commander” of the so-called “South-East army” was detained.

One would think–nothing out of the ordinary, another bandit has been captured. Slap him on the ears–and lock him up.

But in reality, there aren’t too many freaks stirring the pot in Donbass. If a dozen or two pro-Russian “figures” (which have now declared themselves “Ministers,” “Speakers,” and “Commanders-in-Chief”) get locked up–half the work is done. That’s why we should have more news like this.

4. The Ukrainian Defense Minister announced today: servicemen participating in the ATO will receive increased monetary compensation, an expanded range of social guarantees, and number of benefits.

This is a very rare occurrence in Ukraine, where the emergence of new beneficiaries can and should be welcomed.

At the same time, Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk gave instructions to provide housing for the families of servicemen who died during the ATO. And this also is very important.

Guys who shed their blood today for the unity and sovereignty of our state are our Heroes. And the state should do everything it can so that they feel the state’s attention and care. This is the correct thing to do.